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New Apiaries for Honey Bees

Llangattock Apiaries new Bee Hives

Llangattock Apiaries are busy putting out new apiaries for their honey bees

Spring is finally beginning to arrive. We have had a couple of lovely sunny days, the flowers are beginning to open up. The bees are waking up and starting to go out searching for pollen.

It is a busy time of the year for us. We check all of our almost 300 apiaries daily to ensure that they bees are all healthy and that there are not any problems that we need to deal with.

We are increasing our production of our natural honey to supply our customers.

We supply both Trade and individual customers. We now have small, individual 42 grams sized jars of honey which are ideal for Hotels, B & B’s and accommodation providers for Continental breakfasts served in rooms or to go onto the breakfast tables. They are also ideal for guests to buy to take home as a memory of their holiday.

Our honey comes in many different varieties and flavours. We also produce and sell beeswax products. These include honeycomb, pollen, beeswax candles, beeswax food wraps, beeswax lip balm, propolis, honey soap, and nose and paw balm for dogs. We are extending our range all of the time.

If you can’t find any products that you would like to buy, just email Anthony on info@llangattockapiaries.co.uk and we will do our best to help you.

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The History of Beekeeping

LLangattock Apiaries Bees and Honey

Beekeeping is one of the oldest forms of food production dating back as far back as 13,000 BC. The history dates back to ancient Egypt.  Hive beekeeping was well established before the Roman invasion of Britain in AD 43.

According to history beekeeping was practiced for the harvesting of honey, which is the mainstay of a beekeeper’s financial sustenance.  Other items that are harvested from honey are royal jelly and propolis, which were derived for the use of medicinal purposes.  The use of beehive products has changed little since ancient times.

Many different kinds of bees were brought over from places in Europe and even as far as New Zealand.  Until relatively recently beekeeping was a hobby and not a means to make a living that was primarily done by farmers or relatives of a farmer who lived in a rural community where you could set up a bee farm and maintained it from time honoured traditions passed down through the generations.

Why Are the Hives Shaped Like A Honeycomb?

In many different cultures, beekeeping was done to produce honey and beeswax (which was used in candle making and other products), but when an American scientist named L.L. Langstroth took beekeeping to the scientific level in 1851 he innovated the bee space and the removable hive frame. It wasn’t until 1857 that it was discovered that bees could be manipulated into building a straight frame hive by providing them with some wax for a foundation.  Bees would proceed to use the wax foundation to build a honeycomb the octagon-shaped holes that were used to store larvae and later honey once the bees had developed and hatched.  

Over the next few years’ different techniques had been developed to continue modernizing beekeeping, but the most practical invention wasn’t until 1873, which was the smoker, which was a helpful safety device for many beekeepers.  Beekeeping is an art form, which takes a lot of time and practice to master because a skilled beekeeper will learn everything there is to know about beekeeping.  Essentially you will be schooled into this way of life so that everything about beekeeping is like second nature to you so you basically eat, sleep, and breathe the art form of beekeeping.

Passing On Beekeeping To The Next Generation

Beekeepers have a term called Apiculturists because that’s what the Department of Agriculture calls them when they’re categorized for what they do.  People who are Beekeepers are just small offshoots of the agriculture world since it’s pretty much a world of their own with the fact that what they do began as a hobby had slowly transformed into a way of life for people to earn a living at.  People who decide to become Beekeepers that are knowledgeable in biology and entomology can prove to be valuable to the beekeeping market for those who are trying to improve even innovate and create their own unique system of beekeeping which can be passed down to up-and-coming beekeepers who want to learn how to do successful beekeeping.

In summary, beekeeping is a really old tradition that is being kept alive by people who are passionate about bees and keeping them.

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Why Honey?

Honey is a superfood

Honey is 100% natural.  It is healthier than sugar, nutritious, sustainable, versatile and delicious. 

Honey can even help prevent hay fever, it is naturally antibacterial and is a source of minerals.

Humans have been eating honey for thousands of years.   It’s a natural sweetener.

You should eat honey, too.

Local honey is better for you

Llangattock honey is made by bees who gather nectar from the beautiful Brecon Beacons National Park. 

They make wildflower honey because wildflowers grow right outside the hives; in the surrounding fields, on the banks of the River Usk, and on the slopes of the Black Mountains which overlook them.

The honey they make contains traces of pollen; if you eat it, it acts like a vaccine, making your body more resistant to hay fever.

Local honey is better for the environment

A thriving local bee population is essential for our environment. 

The bees pollinate plants around us, promoting biodiversity in our countryside, and keeping our hedgerows and fields healthy and fertile.

Only locally produced raw honey has these benefits; buying from a supermarket isn’t the same.  Mass-produced honey can be blended and filtered in ways which break the link with local flowers and lower the nutritional value.

We have 250 hives in Llangattock, Bwlch and on the slopes of Sugarloaf Mountain.

The bees are tended by Anthony Smith, who has been keeping them for six years.  Anthony says, “We like to think that if you taste our honey, you get a taste of the wildflowers and heathers which surround us.  We do very little to it; it is straight out of the hive and into the jar within 24 hours. What could be more local than that?”

If you buy Llangattock Honey, you will get the best flavour, the highest nutritional content, the very best of what is around you. Buy local, buy Llangattock Honey.